San Pietro e Paolo
JUNE
28-29-30
   
An old tradition says the Apostle Peter came through Salento on his journey from Palestine to Rome. Along his journey, he rested near the casale[small village] of Galatina on a boulder that is now preserved in the mother church. For this reason, the city (until the unification of Italy) was always referred to by the name of Saint Peter in Galatina or St. Peter the Galatinian. To confirm this, the city's coat of arms depicts the crossed keys of St. Peter, which were given to him by Alfonso of Aragon. It seems that even St. Paul passed through Galatina and this is why there is such a bond with the city and people of Taranto, but this story is a legend. It is, indeed, said that St. Paul was hosted by a person from Galatina on a stormy night. The apostle, to thank this person for his hospitality, being a holy miracle worker who protected all from venomous animals, gave this person the power to heal others from the terrible bite of the tarantula spider that infested this land by spitting on the wound. This power was transmitted from father to son, the last sanpaolare[the devoted to St. Paul] were the Farina sisters who lived in the seventeenth century and who, not having any children, decided to make the water of a well of their property “miraculous” by spitting inside it. A noble palace and an adjoining private chapel dedicated to St. Paul was built around this well. According to the Farina sisters' will, it was meant to accommodate those affected with tarantism on the patron feast of the 28th, 29th and 30th of June. The episode is illustrated in the 1793 painting of Francesco Lillo and where the chapel can be admired. Since, St. Paul of Galatina was the saint of the saints who healed those affected with tarantism so much as to be remembered in the “pizzica tarantata”, E santu Paulu miu de Galatina fanne la grazia tie a ‘sta signurina.
   
 



   
  > La Festa
   
 
Photogallery
Photogallery
Photogallery
Foto di Pierluigi Luceri